Architexture

The notebook of Jamie McCue. A collection of pieces from around the web that inspire my work and thinking.

The Wacky Woods

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On Sunday December 15, 2013 the kids and I set out to visit the Wacky Woods. This was my first visit to the woods but the kids have been a few times, so they were excited to show me around. The Wacky Woods is a series of winding trails dotted with enchanting sculptures, most of which are starting to blend into the trees.

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Go with your guts or the data?

“Watching customers use a product through user research is the absolute best way to develop design instincts and avoid mistakes. And user research is really just another stream of data — one that’s qualitative and messy, but still extremely valuable. Strong product teams develop habits that strengthen everyone’s design instincts. One of the best habits to build is a cadence of user research every few weeks.” – @Wired

Storytelling

“And when data and stories are used together, audiences are both moved both intellectually and emotionally, for lasting effect you need to persuade the rational brain but also resonate with the emotional brain.” – Jennifer Aaker

Label Of The Month: Silent Season

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September 24th, 2012 Resident Advisor published a Label of The Month article on Silent Season. Andrew Ryce interviewed me by phone and wrote the article. It’s been a year since that article and I figured I’d share an update on what’s new with Silent Season in the past year.

Given the label is a side project it grows slowly and organically as I don’t spend time seeking reviews or press. I much prefer running things this way as I feel connecting directly with listeners is the most important way to build a fan base. The RA article opened doors to new listeners which is great because there is plenty of music to share.

The past year saw 3 records released including a double 12″ which was the first one I’ve undertaken. Coordinating the mastering, artwork, production and distribution all in Europe took extra time but the quality final vinyl was worth it. We (Segue and I) were fortunate to work with pioneer Stefan Betke (aka Pole) from Scape Mastering for most delicious mastering and lacquers for the Pacifica album.

This past year in addition to the beautiful vinyl releases were some special albums that really connected with me musically and spiritually. I was fortunate to work with artists like Michael Mantra and James Clements (ASC), both who are legends in their own right.

Discography, A Year in Review

Vinyl

SSV03 Edanticonf - Planet (300 transparent records)
SSV04 Refracted – Along a Ghostly Trail (200 black records)
SSV05 Segue – Pacifica (300 black records / double lp)

Update: SSV05 Edanticonf – The Boundary of Nowhere Land (300 black records)

Albums

SSCD13 Segue – Pacifica (Album)
SSCD14 ASC – Time Heals All ‎(Double Album)

SSD07 Edanticonf ‎– Forest Echo (Album)
SSD08 Mindspan – The Second Cycle (Album)
SSD09 Michael Mantra – D/A (Album)
SSD10 Adam Michalak – Returning To Essence (Album)

Digital

SS18 Blazej Malinowski  - Factors

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I was happy to work with Annita Rivera (Plástica) to assist with the new Silent Season tree logo. The tree is an iconic symbol for the label and represents the many roots and connections made in the past 6 years. The new tree logo along with the sky/cloud image and forest/fog image will continue to make up the branding for the label. Plus I have to give a shout out to Danthon who is responsible for all the supernatural photography of Silent Season releases.

You can find more photos of the vinyl, cds, and artwork on the Silent Season Facebook page.

There are a couple more releases due out before the end of the year so stay tuned. Here is where you can find Silent Season online.

Shop | Discogs | Twitter | Facebook | SoundCloud

Thanks for listening.

Visual Interface Design

“A beautiful work that is not usable is worth less than an ugly one that does its function well (unless, of course, if its function is to be beautiful). Thus, we must first of all ensure that every element of the interface is clear, then ensure that their relationships are well defined, and then ensure the work has aesthetic unity. All of these processes happen simultaneously — i.e. you will be creating relationships as you style individual items, and you will have an idea of the final aesthetic effect you wish to achieve from the very start — but the order in which they are satisfied will affect the fitness of the final product.” – @dfadeyev

3 Parts of Good Visual Interface Design

  1. The clarity of individual interface elements
  2. The relationship of every element to every other element
  3. The effect of the composition as a combined whole
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